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The Septuagint Version Of The Old Testament: English Translation by Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brenton

2 KINGS (2 SAM.) 5:18.—Giants. Heb רפאים. For some interesting remarks on this word, see the conclusion of Govett’s work on the book of the prophet Isaiah.

JOB 25:2.—In the New Testament παροιμία is almost always translated proverb, but in John 10:6 it is rendered parable, which seems to be the sense intended here. Probably προοίμιον is a mistake of the transcriber.

JOB 39:13.—τερπομένων. The LXX. seem to have caught at the meaning of רנן jubilavit, from which comes the word here used רננים struthiones. νεέλασσα—Hebrew נעלסּה, part. niph. fem. of עלם lætatus est. ἀσίδα חסדה, ciconia νεσσα נוצה penna (qy. item struthiocamelus). “The peacock’s wing is proudly spread. Is the ostrich also, if it conceive, like the stork? For,” &c. The stork according to tradition being the pious bird, the ostrich the contrary.—C. Pridham.

PSALM 41 (42):4.—There are several difficulties connected with this passage. In the first place it seems evident that the LXX. read בסך, and the English translators בסד, or something similar. The Hebrew Text (to which no קרי is appended) thus far favours the LXX.; who, however, appear to have read אדדם as a part of אדר, and made an adjective of it. Again, τόπῳ has nothing immediately answering it in the Hebrew, and may be accounted for on the principle so often referred to of double translation.

PROVERBS 8:5.—It is frequently the case in Proverbs that ἄκακος is used in a bad sense, and πανοῦργος in a good one. For ἄκακος see chap. 1:4, 22; 8:5; 14:15; 21:11. For πανοῦργος, 12:16; 13:1, 16; 14:8, 15, 18; 15:5; 21:11; 22:3; 27:12; 28:2.

ISAIAH 2:6.—Philistines. The LXX. generally render פלשתים by Φυλιστιεὶμ or Φυλιστιὶμ till about the middle of Judges, after which the word almost always used is ἀλλόφυλοι. In this there was probably some accommodation of sound to sense.

JEZEKIEL 16:44.—The most obvious meaning of παραβολὴ seems to be comparison. The word is so translated, Mark 4:30; in Heb. 9:9 and 11:19 it is rendered figure; in Luke 4:23. proverb, which is the word employed by the English translators in this passage of Ezekiel. In the other passages of the New Testament, amounting to upwards of forty, it is uniformly rendered parable. See note on Job 25:2, about. For the more classical use of the word, see Aristotle’s Rhetoric, book 3.

EXODUS 28. The following verses are found neither in the Vatican nor Alexandrine copies, but appear thus in the Complutensian text:

23 And thou shalt make upon the oracle two golden rings, and thou shalt put the two golden rings on both the upper corners of the oracle. 24 And thou shalt put the fringes and the chains of gold on the two rings on both the sides of the oracle. 25 And thou shalt put two sides of the two fringes on the two hems, and thou shalt put the shoulders of the ephod opposite in front. 26 And thou shalt make two golden rings, and shalt put them on the two edges of the oracle on the top from the top of the back of the ephod within. 27 And thou shalt make two golden rings, and shalt put them on both the shoulders of the ephod beneath it in front, to meet the coupling above of the woven work of the ephod. 28 And thou shalt fasten the oracle by the rings upon it to the rings of the ephod joined with blue lace and attached to the woven work of the ephod, that the oracle may not be loosed from the ephod.








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