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A Commentary On The Psalms From Primitive and Mediæval Writers Volumes 1 To 4 by Rev. J.M. Neale D.D.

ARG. THOMAS. That we are freed by the virtue of CHRIST, and not by our own arm. The Prophet expresseth repentance for all the people of Judah. This Psalm is to be read with the Epistle of Paul1 to the Romans. The Prophet speaketh to the LORD concerning His works. The voice of the whole Church, asking for Divine help in persecution. For public confession of martyrdom.

VEN. BEDE. Whether we here have the words of martyrs or confessors: in the first part they affirm that they have heard how their fathers were victors over many nations, but that they are given over to be the prey of their enemies’ revenge. In the next, they number up the various sufferings which they endure in this present world, and that through them all they remain mindful of GOD. In the third, they ask for help; that, grievously afflicted as they are, they may be assisted in the time of the Resurrection: Up, Lord; why sleepest Thou?

SYRIAC PSALTER. A Psalm of the Sons of Korah, which the people, together with Moses, sang in Horeb. Furthermore, a supplication of the Prophets, David and others. But to us, a hymn of victory against them that attack us.








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