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A Commentary On The Psalms From Primitive and Mediæval Writers Volumes 1 To 4 by Rev. J.M. Neale D.D.

Having finished the first twenty Psalms, most of my fellow-commentators take the opportunity of reviewing what they have already done, and of asking wisdom and power to continue their work to the end. None more beautifully than Gerhohus, who, in his dedication here inserted to Everard, Archbishop of Salzburg, and Gotteschalk, Bishop of Frisingen, well expresses the feelings with which every one should approach such a task as that which I have taken in hand; that he may not by his own fault explain ill, or do injustice to, those words which have been daily, and daily will be to the end of time, the especial delight and comfort of the Church militant.

TITLE. To the Chief Musician upon Aijeleth Shahar: a Psalm of David.

In the Vulgate: To the end, for the morning undertaking: a Psalm of David.

Most mediæval writers: To the end, for the morning hind: a Psalm of David.

Others: To the Supreme, in the midst of gloom.

In this variety of translations, it is better simply to give the meaning proposed to each. The morning undertaking is explained of the capture of our LORD in the morning by the Jews; the commencement of that Passion of which the Psalm treats. To this explanation S. Ambrose and Cassiodorus refer. But the majority of the Fathers understood it of the Resurrection, as having taken place very early in the morning; and to the Resurrection the end of the Psalm certainly alludes. Those who translate, for the morning hind, naturally see in this hind the type of our LORD, hunted by His enemies, driven into the snares, and so slain. The mediæval catalogue of the characteristics of the hind naturally led the authors of that time to prefer this meaning. The last translation, if it may be allowed, explains itself. The Chaldee paraphrase, varying from all the others, interprets it, “Concerning the powerful oblation of the perpetual morning:” which, at all events, affords a very beautiful mystical interpretation: the powerful oblation being the never-failing intercession of Him Who is indeed the everlasting Morning of His people.








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