HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







An Exposition Of the Epistles Of Saint Paul And Of The Catholic Epistles Volumes 1&2

Introduction

CANONICITY OF.—This, as well as the Third Epistle of St. John, is reckoned among the Deutero-canonical Books of Scriptures, that is to say, those books the Divine authority of which was not always admitted in the Church. Their authenticity also had been questioned. Many among the ancients, whose opinion is embraced by Erasmus, looked upon them as the production of another John, called the Senior, of whom there is mention made in the writings of Papias (vide Eusebium lib. 3). (Historiæ, cap. ultim., St. Jerome, de Script. Eccles). However, it is now a point of Catholic faith, defined by the Council of Trent (SS. 4), that they are both divinely inspired Scripture, written by St. John, the Apostle. The Councils of Carthage (3rd) and of Laodicea, preceded the Fathers of Trent, in the same declaration. The earliest among the Fathers quote from them, as inspired Scripture. Tertullian (de Præscriptionibus, ch. 33, et libro iii. 14, et lib. iv. 5, contra Marcionem), says, the author of these, and of the Apocalypse, is the same—viz., John the Apostle. Clement, of Alexandria, commented on both Epistles, as the production of the Apostle. Innocent I. (Ep. 3, ad Exuperium) places them on the catalogue of inspired books. St. Augustine (lib. 2, de Doctrina Christiana), St. Jerome (Epistola 85) quote them, as the inspired production of the same. Since the fourth or fifth century they have been regularly received by the Church as divinely inspired, and written by St. John.

TO WHOM ADDRESSED.—It is addressed to “the lady Elect and her children” (ch. 1:1).—But it is warmly controverted, whether, by “the lady Elect,” is meant a particular person, or some particular Church, to which St. John wishes to impart encouragement and consolation, and wishes to put on their guard, against the prevailing heresies of the day. Mauduit, in a learned dissertation, endeavours to prove the latter supposition to be the more probable. The former opinion, which understands the word of a certain lady of quality, is the more common. Whether “Elect” was her proper name, or an epithet given her for her superior virtues and endowments, is a matter not determined upon either. By some it is contended that it was her proper name, and that the article was omitted in the Greek, on this account. Others maintain it was only an epithet given her on account of her virtues, and, particularly, her generous charity towards the preachers of the gospel, and distressed Christians, so much commended by St. Paul in his first Epistle to Timothy, “si pedes sanctorum lavit.” The Greek construction, which places “elect” before “lady,” εκλεκτῇ κυρια, favours this opinion; so does the application of the same term to her sister (verse 13); for, it is not likely there were two of the same name in one family. Moreover, the Latin interpreter, who rendered the Greek word “εκλεκτα,” in Latin, “Electa,” seems to favour the same opinion. However, nothing can be determined for certain, on this subject.

WHEN AND WHERE WRITTEN.—Both are uncertain. It is likely, it was written at Ephesus, where St. John died in the the third year of Trajan, and ninety-ninth year of the Christian era. And it is equally probable, that it was written at the close of his life.








Copyright ©1999-2018 e-Catholic2000.com