HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







A Practical Commentary On Holy Scripture by Frederick Justus Knecht D.D.

I. “My doctrine is not mine, but His that sent Me. If any man will do the will of Him, he shall know the doctrine, whether it be of God, or whether I speak of Myself.”

II. “I am the Light of the world; he that followeth Me, walketh not in darkness, but shall have the light of life.”

III. “If any man will come after Me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross and follow Me.”

IV. “The foxes have holes, and the birds of the air nests, but the Son of Man hath not where to lay His head.”

V. “He that loveth father or mother more than Me is not worthy of Me; and he that loveth son or daughter more than Me is not worthy of Me.”

VI. “He that loveth his life shall lose it, and he that hateth his life in this world keepeth it unto life eternal.”

VII. “The kingdom of heaven suffereth violence, and the violent bear it away.”

VIII. “What doth it profit a man, if he gain the whole world, and suffer the loss of his own soul? Or what exchange shall a man give for his soul?”

IX. “No man can come to Me, except the Father who hath sent Me, draw him1; and I will raise him1 up at the last day.”—“If any man keep My word1, he shall not see death1 for ever.”

X. “Come to Me all you that labour and are burdened1, and I will refresh you1. Take up My yoke1 upon you and learn of Me, because I am meek and humble of heart, and you shall find rest for your souls. For My yoke is sweet, and My burden is light.”

Test of Divine Doctrine. He whose heart is bent upon serving God, doing His will and practising the moral precepts of our Lord, will soon recognise and feel within his mind and heart that the doctrine proposed by our Lord is and must be divine. The true faith comes to those of good will. Virtue protects, increases and strengthens faith; whereas vice weakens it, and produces an aversion to its grand teachings, which leads the sinner ultimately into unbelief.

True light. The light of life is the faith taught by Jesus Christ. Without this faith nobody can be saved. True enlightenment, certainty and conviction can only come by faith. Darkness, uncertainty, and the want of all comfort follow unbelief.

Self-denial is necessary for every Christian, for without self-denial there can exist no virtue. Our Lord Jesus Himself went before us to show us the way, and His whole Life on earth was one great act of self-renunciation and self-denial.

The poverty of our Lord was very great. He was born in a stable, and possessed no dwelling-place of His own all the time He dwelt on earth; and He often spent the night praying in the open air. He wandered about as a stranger, living on alms. His only death-bed was the Cross (on which, in very truth, He had not where to lay His Head), and His Body was buried in another man’s sepulchre. The words: “Blessed are the poor in spirit” apply to all true followers of Jesus Christ.

The love of God above all things. Because Jesus is God and has loved us even unto death, we, on our side, must love Him above all things—more than father or mother, more than our own lives. He who loves this life more than God, and who, if the choice is given to him, forsakes God rather than lose his life, is sure to lose his life in eternity. But he who esteems this life as little compared with eternal life and will give it for Christ’s sake, will certainly gain everlasting life. The Church teaches that the holy martyrs pass straight to heaven, without tasting of Purgatory. “If those who prefer this earthly life (the most precious of natural gifts) to the service of God, forfeit all claim to eternal life, how much more do those endanger their salvation who refuse to mortify the lusts of the flesh, and give up faith, love, and the service of God for the basest pleasures and possessions of this world!” (St. Chrysostom.)

Temperance and fortitude. He who wishes to win heaven must steadfastly restrain his evil inclinations and passions, fight against all external temptations, and never be turned from what is right by any difficulties or persecutions.

The greatest loss. “What will it profit a man if he gain the whole world and suffer the loss of his own soul?” It would profit a man nothing if he possessed all the power, honour and riches that it was possible for him to have, and injured his soul thereby. All sin, and especially mortal sin, does injury to the soul. If, therefore, a man could gain the whole world by committing one mortal sin, would it be of any profit to him? None at all, for death would take all his possessions from him, and he would then be punished for ever in hell.

Once lost, for ever lost! “Or what can a man give in exchange for his soul?” What can he do or give to redeem his soul from hell? Nothing! Once a man’s soul is lost, it remains lost, and nothing can redeem it from everlasting damnation. The care of our soul is our one important business in life, “the one thing needful”.

The necessity of grace. Grace “draws” us, by enlightening us and awakening in us a desire for salvation; but it does not compel us. God leaves us at perfect liberty either to obey or resist the attractions of grace.

The resurrection of the body. On the last day our Lord Jesus Christ will raise to life the bodies of the dead (Eleventh article of the creed).

Life everlasting (Twelfth article of the creed).

The law of Jesus is sweet and easy 1. because the purport of it is love, and love makes all duties light and pleasant; 2. because Jesus does not merely impose duties on us, but helps us by His grace to fulfil them; 3. because Jesus has gone before us, showing us an example. He Himself has done everything which He requires us to do, and that in the most perfect manner, as, for example, showing love to our enemies. His law is sweet and easy 4. because an exceeding great reward is promised to us if we obey it, namely, peace and joy of heart on earth, and inconceivable glory and happiness in heaven.

Gentleness and humility are especially taught us by the example of our Lord Jesus. The sins contrary to these virtues are the two capital sins of anger and pride.

Devotion of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Our Lord Himself directs us to His Sacred Heart and invites us to imitate its virtues of love, mercy, gentleness, humility, obedience, patience, fortitude &c. The Heart of Jesus is the model of all virtues and the fountain of all grace, and must therefore be loved and adored by all who love Jesus. The Feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus is kept on the Friday [in some places, on the Sunday] after the Octave of Corpus Christi.

APPLICATION. Examine your conscience on the subject of gentleness; make acts of contrition, and good resolutions.

Happiness can only be found with Jesus. As long as you follow Him, and are obedient and innocent, you will have peace and joy of heart. But if you do what is wrong, you will feel discontented, restless and troubled. Keep, therefore, away from sin; it will make you very unhappy.








Copyright ©1999-2018 e-Catholic2000.com