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A History Of The Church In Nine Books by Sozomen

AFTER having written in this strain to Julius, the bishops of the East brought accusations against those whom they had deposed before the Emperor Constantius. Accordingly the emperor, who was then at Antioch, wrote to Philip, the prefect of Constantinople, commanding him to reinstate Macedonius in the government of the church, and to expel Paul from the city. The prefect, fearing lest the execution of this order should give rise to a sedition among the people, kept the whole matter a profound secret. He repaired to the public bath, which is called Zeuxippus, a large and beautiful structure, and having sent for Paul, as if he wished to converse with him on some affairs of general interest, showed him, on his arrival, the edict of the emperor. Paul was immediately and secretly conveyed through the palace, which is contiguous to the bath, to the sea-side, and was placed on board a vessel, and conducted to Thessalonica, whence, it is said, his ancestors originally came. He was strictly prohibited from approaching the Eastern regions, but was not forbidden to visit Illyria and the remoter provinces.

On quitting the prætorium, Philip, accompanied by Macedonius, proceeded to the church. The people, who had in the mean time been assembling together, quickly filled the church, and the two parties into which they were divided, namely, the Arians and the followers of Paul, respectively strove to take possession of the church. When the prefect and Macedonius arrived at the gates of the church, the soldiers endeavoured to force back the people, but, as they were so crowded together, it was impossible for them to recede or make way; the soldiers, under the impression that they were met to resist the imperial authority, drew their swords and killed many persons, and several others were slain in the crowd. The edict of the emperor was thus accomplished, and Macedonius reinstated in the government of the church, while Paul, contrary to all previous expectation, was ejected from the church.

Athanasius in the meantime had fled, and concealed himself, dreading to be put to death, according to the menaces of the Emperor Constantius; for the heterodox had made the emperor believe that he was a seditious person, and that he had, on his return to the bishopric, occasioned the death of several persons. But the anger of the emperor had been chiefly excited by the representation that Athanasius had sold the wheat which the Emperor Constantine had bestowed on the poor of Alexandria, and had appropriated the price.








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