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A History Of The Church In Nine Books by Sozomen

THE ordination of Paul occasioned a great commotion in the church of Constantinople. During the life of Alexander the Arians did not venture to excite any insurrection, for the people were implicitly obedient to their bishop, and attached to his sway, and, moreover, regarded the extraordinary and unexpected death of Arms as a manifest indication of divine wrath, drawn down upon him, so to speak, by the prayers and virtues of Alexander. After the death of this bishop, however, the people became divided into two parties, and disputes and contests concerning doctrines were openly carried on. The adherents of Arius desired the ordination of Macedonius, while those who maintained that the Son is consubstantial with the Father wished to have Paul as their bishop; and this latter party prevailed. After the ordination of Paul the emperor returned to Constantinople, and manifested as much displeasure at what had taken place as if Paul had been unworthy of the bishopric. Through the machinations of the enemies of Paul a synod was convened, and he was expelled from the church. Eusebius, bishop of Nicomedia, was installed in the bishopric of Constantinople.








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