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A History Of The Church In Nine Books by Sozomen

ALEXANDER died about this time, and Paul obtained the bishopric of Constantinople. The followers of Arius and Macedonius assert that he took possession of this office without the concurrence of Eusebius, bishop of Nicomedia; or of Theodore, bishop of Heraclea, in Thrace; upon whom, as being the nearest bishops, the right of conferring ordination devolved. Many, however, maintain, on the testimony of Alexander whom he succeeded, that he was ordained by the bishops who were then assembled at Constantinople. For when Alexander, who was eighty-nine years of age, and who had held the episcopal office for twenty-three years, was at the point of death, his clergy asked him whom he wished to succeed him in the government of his church. “If,” replied he, “you seek a good man, and one who is apt to teach, you have Paul. But if you desire one who is conversant with public affairs, and able to confer with rulers, Macedonius is, in these respects, more qualified than Paul.” The Macedonians themselves admit that this testimony was given by Alexander; bat they say that Paul was the more skilled of the two in the transaction of business and the art of eloquence, and that Macedonius was celebrated on account of the purity of his life and conduct; and they accuse Paul of having been addicted to luxury and licentiousness. It appears, however, from their own acknowledgment, that Paul was a man of great eloquence, and highly renowned on account of his skill in teaching the church. Events proved that he was not competent to combat the casualties of life, or to hold intercourse with those in power. He was never successful in subverting the machinations of his enemies, like those who are adroit in the management of such affairs. Although he was greatly beloved by the people he suffered severely from the artifices of those who rejected the doctrines established by the council of Nicæa. In the first place, he was expelled from the church of Constantinople, as if some accusation had been established against him. He was then sent into banishment, and finally, it is said, fell a victim to the devices of his enemies, and was strangled. But these latter events took place at a subsequent period.








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