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A History Of The Church In Nine Books by Sozomen

THE troops of Constans were shortly afterwards strengthened by reinforcements, and Didymus and Verinian, with their wives, were taken prisoners, and were eventually put to death. Their brothers Theodosiolus and Lagodius fled the country, and sought refuge elsewhere: the former escaped to Italy, and put himself under the protection of the emperor Honorius; the latter fled to the East, and sought safety at the court of Theodosius. After these transactions, Constans returned to his father; but, on leaving the country, he established forts along the frontiers, which he garrisoned with his own soldiers; for he feared to adopt the ancient custom of entrusting the Spaniards with the defence of their native land. This precaution was probably the cause of the ruin of the country; for, when Constantine was deprived of his power, the Vandals, Suevi, and Alans seized the mountain passes, took possession of many forts and cities in Spain and Gaul, and arrested the chief officers of the tyrant.

In the meantime Constantine, who was still confident of ultimate success, caused his son Constans to be proclaimed emperor, and determined to possess himself of Italy. With this view, he crossed the Cottian Alps, and entered Verona, a city of Liguria. He was on the point of crossing the Po, when he was compelled to retrace his steps, by the intelligence which was then conveyed to him of the death of Alanicus. This Alanicus was the commander of the troops of Honorius, and being suspected of conspiring to place the Western empire under the domination of Constantine, he was slain when returning from a procession, in which, according to custom, it was his office to march in advance of the emperor. Immediately after this occurrence, the emperor descended from horseback, and publicly returned thanks to God for having delivered him from one who had openly conspired against him. Constantine fled to Aries, and Constans his son hastened from Spain, and sought refuge in the same city.

On the decline of the power of Constantine, the Vandals, Suevi, and Alans took forcible possession of the rich and fertile region of the Pyrenees. They easily dispossessed the soldiers whom Constans had left to guard the frontier, and effected an entrance into Spain.








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