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A History Of The Church In Nine Books by Sozomen

IT happened about the same time that the Huns, who were encamped in Thrace, suddenly took to flight, although they had neither been attacked nor pursued. Uldis, the leader of some barbarous tribes who dwell near the Danube, crossed that river at the head of a large army, and encamped on the frontiers of Thrace. He took possession of a city of Mœsia called the Camp of Mars, and thence made incursions in Thrace, and insolently refused to enter into terms of alliance with the Romans. The prefect of the Thracian cohorts made propositions of peace to him; but he replied by pointing to the sun, and declaring that it would be easy to him, if he desired to do so, to subjugate every region of the earth that is enlightened by that luminary. But, while Uldis was uttering menaces of this description, and even threatening to impose a tribute on the Romans, God gave manifest proofs of special favour towards the emperor; for, shortly afterwards, the immediate attendants and chief officers of Uldis were discussing the Roman form of government, the philanthropy of the emperor, and his promptitude in rewarding merit, when they suddenly formed the resolution of ranging themselves under the Roman banners. Finding himself thus abandoned, Uldis escaped with difficulty to the opposite bank of the river. Many of his troops were slain; and, among others, a barbarous tribe called the Sciri: this tribe had previously been very strong, in point of numbers; but, being pursued and overtaken when vainly endeavouring to effect an escape, many of its members were cut to pieces, and others were taken prisoners, and conveyed in chains to Constantinople. The governors were of opinion that, if allowed to remain together, they would probably combine, and create a sedition: some of them were, therefore, sold at a low price, while others were given away as slaves, upon condition that they should never be permitted to return to Constantinople, or to Europe, but be conveyed across the sea. I have seen several of these slaves employed in cultivating the earth in Bithynia, near Mount Olympus.








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