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A History Of The Church In Nine Books by Sozomen

AS soon as John was raised to the episcopal dignity, he devoted his attention to the reformation of the lives of his clergy, and to the regulation of their pursuits and conduct. He even ejected some of the clergy from the church. He was naturally disposed to reprehend the misconduct of others, and to feel excessive indignation against those who acted unjustly; and these characteristics gained strength after his elevation to the bishopric; for when power was placed in his hands, he became more zealous than ever in testifying his anger and resentment against sin. He did not confine his efforts to the reformation of his own church, but sought to rectify abuses throughout the world. He strove to put an end to the dissension which had arisen concerning Paulinus, between the Western and Egyptian bishops, and the bishops of the East; and requested the assistance of Theophilus in effecting the reconciliation of Flavian with the bishop of Rome. Theophilus agreed to co-operate with him in the restoration of concord; and Acacius, bishop of Berœa, and Isidore, whom Theophilus had proposed as a candidate for ordination instead of John, were sent on an embassy to Rome. They soon effected the object of their journey, and returned to Egypt. Acacius repaired to Syria, bearing conciliatory letters concerning Flavian, from the bishops of Egypt and of the West. By these means, unity was restored among the churches after a long period of mutual animosity and division. The people at Antioch, who were called Eustathians, continued, indeed, for some time to hold separate assemblies, although they possessed no bishop. Evagrius, the successor of Paulinus, did not, as we have stated, long survive him, and unanimity was the more easily re-established from there being no one to keep up the division. The laity, as is customary with the populace, gradually went over to those who assembled together under the guidance of Flavian: and thus, in course of time, unity was restored among them.








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