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A History Of The Church In Seven Books by Socrates

WHILE the emperor Constantius continued his residence at Antioch, Julian Cæsar engaging with an immense army of barbarians in the Gallias obtained a distinguished victory over them: on which account having become extremely popular among the soldiery, they proclaim him emperor. Intelligence of this affected the emperor Constantius with the most painful sensations; he was therefore baptized by Euzoïus, and immediately prepared to undertake an expedition against Julian. On arriving at the frontiers of Cappadocia and Cilieia, his excessive agitation of mind produced apoplexy, which terminated his existence at Mopsucrene, in the consulate of Taurus and Florentius, on the 3rd of November, in the first year of the 285th Olympiad. This prince was at the time of his death forty-five years old, having reigned thirty-eight years, thirteen of which he was his father’s colleague in the empire, and the remaining twenty-five he had the sole administration, the history of which latter period is contained in this book.








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