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A History Of The Church In Seven Books by Socrates

BUT Eusebius was prevented from knowing the decision of Julius concerning Athanasius, for he died a short time after that Synod was held. Whereupon the people introduce Paul again into the church of Constantinople: the Arians however ordain Macedonius at the same time, in the church dedicated to Paul. This was done by those who had formerly lent their aid to Eusebius (that disturber of the public peace), but who then had assumed all his authority; viz. Theognis bishop of Nice, Maris of Chalcedon, Theodore of Heraclea in Thrace, Ursacius of Singidunum in Upper Mysia, and Valens of Mursa in Upper Pannonia. Ursacius and Valens indeed afterward altered their opinions, and presented a written recantation of them to bishop Julius, so that on subscribing the doctrine of consubstantiality they were again admitted to communion; but at that time they warmly supported the Arian error, and were instigators of the most violent commotions in the churches, one of which was connected with Macedonius at Constantinople. By this intestine war among the Christians, that city was kept in a state of perpetual turbulence, and the most atrocious outrages were perpetrated, whereby many lives were sacrificed.








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