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A History Of The Church In Seven Books by Socrates

IN the following year, the emperor Constantine having just entered the sixty-fifth year of his age, was attacked with a dangerous malady; he therefore left Constantinople, and made a voyage to Helenopolis, that he might try the effect of the medicinal hot springs which are found in the vicinity of that city. Perceiving however that his illness increased, he deferred the use of the baths; and removing from Helenopolis to Nicomedia, he took up his residence in the suburbs, and there received Christian baptism. After this he became cheerful and resigned; and making his wil, appointed his three sons heirs to the empire, allotting to each one of them his portion, in accordance with his previous arrangements. He also granted many privileges to the cities of Rome and Constantinople; and entrusting the custody of his will to that presbyter by whose means Arius had been recalled, and of whom mention has been already made, he charged him to deliver it into no one’s hand, except that of his son Constantius, to whom he had given the sovereignty of the East. He survived but a few days after the execution of this document, and died in the absence of all his sons. A courier was therefore immediately despatched into the East, to inform Constantius of his father’s decease.








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