HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







A History Of The Church In Seven Books by Socrates

THE emperor Constantine had a sister named Constantia, formerly the wife of Licinius who, after having for some time shared the imperial dignity with Constantine, was put to death in consequence of his tyranny and ambition. This princess maintained in her household establishment a certain confidential presbyter, tinctured with the dogmas of Arianism; who being prompted by Eusebius and others, took occasion in his familiar conversations with Constantia, to insinuate that the Synod had done Arius injustice, and that his sentiments were greatly misrepresented. Constantia gave full credence to the presbyter’s assertions, but durst not report them to the emperor; until at length she became dangerously ill, which caused her brother to visit her daily. When the disease had reduced her to such a state that her speedy dissolution seemed inevitable, she commended this presbyter to the emperor, testifying to his diligence and piety, as well as his devoted loyalty to his sovereign. On her death, which occurred soon after, the presbyter became one of the most confidential persons about the emperor; and having gradually increased in freedom of speech, he repeated to the emperor what he had before stated to his sister, affirming that the opinions of Arius were perfectly accordant with the sentiments avowed by the Synod; and that if he were admitted to the imperial presence, he would give his full assent to what the Synod had decreed: he added moreover that he had been falsely accused without the slightest reason. The emperor was astonished at the presbyter’s discourse, and replied, “If Arius subscribes to the Synod’s determination, and his views correspond with that, I will both give him an audience, and send him back to Alexandria with honour.” Having thus said, he immediately wrote to him in these words:—

“VICTOR CONSTANTINE MAXIMUS AUGUSTUS, TO ARIUS

“It was intimated to your reverence some time since, that you might come to my court, in order to your being admitted to the enjoyment of our presence. We are not a little surprised that you did not immediately avail yourself of this permission. Wherefore having at once mounted a public vehicle, hasten to arrive at our court; that when you have experienced our clemency and regard for you, you may return to your own country. May God protect you, beloved.”

This letter was dated the twenty-fifth of November. And one cannot but be struck with the ardent zeal which this prince manifested for religion: for it appears from this document that he had often before exhorted Arius to retract his opinions, inasmuch as he censures his delaying to return to the truth, although he had himself written frequently to him. Not long after the receipt of this letter, Arius came to Constantinople accompanied by Euzoïus, whom Alexander had divested of his deaconship when Arius and his adherents were excommunicated. The emperor accordingly admitted them to his presence, and asked them whether they would agree to the Nicene creed? And when they readily gave their assent, he ordered them to deliver to him a written statement of their faith.








Copyright ©1999-2018 e-Catholic2000.com