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A History Of The Church In Seven Books by Socrates

ABOUT the same time, under the seventeenth consulate of Theodosius, Proclus the bishop undertook the performance of an act, for which there was no precedent among the ancient prelates. Firmus bishop of Cæsarea in Cappadocia being dead, the inhabitants of that place came to Constantinople to consult Proclus about the appointment of some one to succeed him. While Proclus was considering whom he should prefer to that see, it so happened that all the senators came to the church to visit him on the sabbath day; among whom was Thalassius also, who had administered the government of the nations and cities of Illyricum. But notwithstanding the report of his being the person to whom the emperor was about to entrust the government of the Eastern parts, Proclus laid his hands on him, and ordained him bishop of Cæsarea, instead of his being constituted Prætorian Præfect. In such a flourishing condition were the affairs of the church at this time. But I shall here close my history, praying that the churches everywhere, with the cities and nations, may live in peace; for as long as peace continues, those who desire to become historians will find no materials for their purpose. And we ourselves, O holy man of God, Theodore, should have been unable to accomplish in seven books the task we undertook at your request, had the lovers of seditions chosen to be quiet. This last book contains an account of the transactions of the last thirty-two years: and the whole history which is comprised in seven books, comprehends a period of 140 years. It commences from the first year of the 271st Olympiad, in which Constantine was proclaimed emperor; and ends at the second year of the 305th Olympiad, in which the emperor Theodosius bore his seventeenth consulate.








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