HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







A History Of The Church In Seven Books by Socrates

A LITTLE while after the removal of John’s body, Paul bishop of the Novatians died, on the 21st of July, under the same consulate: who at his own funeral united, in a certain sense, all the different sects into one church For such was the universal esteem in which he was held because of his rectitude of life, that all parties attended his body to the tomb, chanting psalms together. But as Paul just before his death performed a memorable act, which it may be interesting to the readers of this work to be acquainted with, I shall insert it here. And lest the brilliancy of that important deed should be obscured by dwelling on circumstantial details of minor consequence, I shall not stay to expatiate on the strictness with which he maintained his ascetic discipline as to diet even throughout his illness, without the least departure from the course he had prescribed for himself, or the omission of any of the ordinary exercises of devotion with his accustomed fervour. Conscious that his departure was at hand, he sent for all the presbyters of the churches under his care, and thus addressed them: “Give your attention while I am. alive to the election of a bishop to preside over you, lest the peace of the church should hereafter be disturbed.” They having answered that this affair had better not be left to them: “For inasmuch,” said they, “as some of us have one judgment about the matter, and some another, we shall never agree to nominate the same individual. We wish therefore that you would yourself designate the person you would desire to succeed you.” “Give me then,” said Paul, “this declaration of yours in writing, that you will elect him whom I shall appoint. When they had written this pledge, and ratified it by their signatures, Paul rising in his bed and sitting up, wrote the name of Marcian in the paper, without informing any of those present what he had inserted. This person had been promoted to the rank of presbyter, and instructed in the ascetic discipline by him, but was then gone abroad. Having folded this document and put his own seal on it, he caused the principal presbyters to seal it also; after which he delivered it into the hands of Marcus a bishop of the Novatians in Scythia, who was at that time staying at Constantinople: to whom he thus spake. “If it shall please God that I should continue much longer in this life, restore me this deposit, now entrusted to your safe keeping. But should it seem fit to Him to remove me, you will herein discover whom I have chosen as my successor in the bishopric.” Soon after this he died: and the paper having been unfolded on the third day after, in the presence of a great number of persons, Marcian’s name was found within it, when they all cried out that he was worthy of the honour. Messengers were therefore sent off without delay to bring him to Constantinople, who finding him residing at Tiberiopolis in Phrygia, brought him back with them by a pious fraud; whereupon he was ordained and placed in the episcopal chair on the 21st of August following.








Copyright ©1999-2018 e-Catholic2000.com