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A History Of The Church In Seven Books by Socrates

AFTER this there was another debate concerning the election of a bishop of Constantinople. Many were in favour of Philip, of whom we have already spoken; but a still greater number advocated the claims of Proclus. And the votes of the majority would have determined the matter, had not some influential persons interfered, on the ground of its being forbidden by the ecclesiastical canon that a person nominated to one bishopric should be translated to another See. The people believing this assertion, were thereby restrained; and about four months after the deposition of Nestorius, a presbyter named Maximian, who had lived an ascetic life, was elected to this episcopate. He was neither an eloquent man, nor at all disposed to trouble himself with the busy affairs of life; but had acquired a high reputation for sanctity, on account of having at his own expense constructed sepulchral depositaries for the reception of the pious after their decease.








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