HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







A History Of The Church In Seven Books by Socrates

SHORTLY after this, the emperor’s mandate was issued directing the bishops in all places to assemble at Ephesus. Immediately after Easter therefore, Nestorius escorted by a strong body of his adherents repaired to that city, and found many prelates already there. Cyril bishop of Alexandria made some delay, and did not arrive till near Pentecost; and Juvenal bishop of Jerusalem was not present until five days after that feast. While John of Antioch was still absent, those who were now congregated entered into the consideration of the question; and Cyril of Alexandria began a sharp skirmish of words, with the design of terrifying Nestorius, for whom he had a strong dislike. When many had declared that Christ was God, Nestorius said: “I cannot term him God who was two and three months old. I am therefore clear of your blood, and shall in future come no more among you.” Having uttered these words he left the assembly, and afterwards held meetings with the other bishops who entertained sentiments similar to his own. Thus were those present divided into two factions. That section which supported Cyril, having constituted themselves a council, summoned Nestorius: but he refused to meet them, until John of Antioch should arrive. They therefore proceeded to the examination of the public discourses of Nestorius which had been the main subject of complaint; and after deciding from a repeated perusal of them that they contained blasphemy against the Son of God, they deposed him. This being done, the partisans of Nestorius constituted themselves another council apart, and therein deposed Cyril himself, and together with him Memnon bishop of Ephesus. John bishop of Antioch made his appearance soon after these transactions; and being informed of what had taken place, he pronounced unqualified censure on Cyril as the author of all this confusion, in having so precipitately proceeded to the deposition of Nestorius. Upon this Cyril combined with Juvenal to revenge themselves on John, and they deposed him also. When Nestorius saw that the contention which had been raised was thus tending to schism and the destruction of communion, in bitter regret he cried out: “Let Mary be called Theotocos, if you will, and let all disputing cease.” But although he made this recantation, no notice was taken of it; for his deposition was not revoked, and he was banished to Oasis, where he still remains. Such was the conclusion of this Synod, which was dissolved on the 28th of June, under the consulate of Bassus and Antiochus. John when he had returned to his bishopric, having convened several prelates, deposed Cyril, who had also returned to his See: but being reconciled soon after, they mutually reinstated each other in their episcopal chairs. But the dissension which had been excited in the church of Constantinople by the absurd garrulity of Nestorius, was by no means allayed after his deposition; for the people were so agitated by divisions, that the clergy unanimously anathematized him. For such is the sentence which we Christians are accustomed to pronounce on those who have advanced any blasphemous doctrines, in order that their impiety may be publicly exposed as it were on a pillar, to universal execration.








Copyright ©1999-2018 e-Catholic2000.com