HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







A History Of The Church In Seven Books by Socrates

IN the first place then, Theophilus attempted to call in question the legitimacy of Heraclides’s ordination, that thereby he might if possible find occasion of again deposing John. Heraclides was not present at this scrutiny; nevertheless they condemned him in his absence, on the charge of having unjustly beaten some persons, and afterwards dragged them in chains through the midst of the city of Ephesus. John and his adherents remonstrated against the injustice of passing sentence upon an absent person; but the Alexandrians contended that his accusers ought to be heard, although he was not present. A sharp contest therefore ensued between the Alexandrians and the Constantinopolitans which led to blows, whereby many persons were wounded, and some few killed. Theophilus seeing what was done, instantly fled to Alexandria; and the other bishops, except the few who supported John, followed his example, and returned to their respective Sees. After these transactions, Theophilus was degraded in everyone’s estimation: but the odium attached to him was exceedingly increased by the shameless way in which he continued to read Origen’s works. And when he was asked why he thus countenanced what he had publicly condemned? he replied, “Origen’s books are like a meadow enamelled with flowers of every kind. If therefore I chance to find a beautiful one among them, I cull it: but whatever appears to me to be thorny, I pass by, as that which would prick.” But Theophilus gave this answer without reflecting on the saying of the wise Solomon, that the words of the wise are as goads; and those who are pricked by the precepts they contain, ought not to kick against them. Soon after the flight of Theophilus, Discorus bishop of Hermopolis, one of those termed the Long Monks, died, and was honoured with a magnificent funeral, being interred in the church at, “The Oak,” where the Synod was convened on John’s account. John meanwhile was sedulously employed in preaching; and ordained Serapion bishop of Heraclea in Thrace, on whose account the odium against himself had been raised. The following events occurred not long after.








Copyright ©1999-2018 e-Catholic2000.com