HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







A History Of The Church In Five Books by Theodoret

EUNOMIUS, in his writings, highly extolled Aëtius, styled him the man of God, and bestowed many encomiums on him; still he did not refrain from intimacy with those who had condemned him; and he even received ordination from them, being raised by them to the episcopal dignity. The partisans of Eudoxius and of Acacius, who had approved of the formulary compiled at Nice in Thrace, of which mention has already been made, ordained two bishops in the room of Basil and Eleusius whom they had deposed. As I think it would be superfluous to enter into particulars respecting the other bishops, I shall only relate what concerns Eunomius. The government of the church of Cyzicum being seized by Eunomius while Eleusius was still living, Eudoxius, who perceived the attachment of the people to sound doctrine, and who was also aware that the emperor had expressed indignation against those who said that the only begotten Son of God had been created, counselled Eunomius to conceal his sentiments, and not to let them be known to those who were earnestly seeking an opportunity for framing accusations against him. “At some future period,” said he, “we will preach that which we now conceal, we will instruct the ignorant, and will silence our opponents either by arguments, by force, or by vengeance.” Eunomius, in accordance with this advice, concealed his impiety by involving his doctrines in obscure phraseology. But those who were well instructed in the holy Scriptures perceived the fraud, and felt it deeply; but they conceived that the manifestation of any opposition would be more rash than prudent. Under the pretence of having imbibed heretical opinions, they went to his house, and besought him to expound to them the truth which he maintained, that they might not be driven hither and thither by contrary doctrines. He was led to place confidence in them, and disclosed to them the doctrines which he had till then concealed. They then told him that it would be exceedingly unjust and impious if he did not communicate the truth to all men. Eunomius was deceived by these and other similar arguments, and accordingly divulged his blasphemous opinions in the public assemblies of the church. They then, transported with zeal, hastened to Constantinople, and laid their accusation against Eunomius, in the first place, before Eudoxius; but as he would not receive it, they repaired to the emperor to complain to him of the injury committed by Eunomius, whom they accused of advancing doctrines more impious than the blasphemies of Arius. The emperor was much incensed on receiving this information; and he commanded Eudoxius to send for Eunomius, and upon his conviction to deprive him of the sacerdotal office. Finding that Eudoxius persisted in delay, notwithstanding their numerous solicitations, the accusers again repaired to the emperor, and declared that Eudoxius had disobeyed the command imposed on him, and that he suffered so great a city to be abandoned to the blasphemies of Eunomius. Constantius then menaced Eudoxius with banishment unless he would bring him forward to judgment, and inflict upon him the penalties of the law, should he be convicted of the crimes laid to his charge. Eudoxius, terrified by these menaces, wrote to Eunomius, desiring him to flee from Cyzicum, and to impute all the blame to himself for not having followed the advice which had been given him. Eunomius was fearful for his own safety, and therefore retreated. He accused Eudoxius of treachery and injustice towards him and towards Aëtius. From that time he began to form a sect of his own. All those who had previously held the same sentiments as himself went over to him, and inveighed against the treachery of Eudoxius. They were called Eunomians after their leader, which name they have retained to this day. Eunomius being thus placed at the head of a faction, gave still greater weight by his impiety to the blasphemy of Arius. The facts themselves clearly prove that in making himself the head of a party he was solely impelled by ambition and the love of glory. Thus, when Aëtius was condemned and banished, he would not accompany him into exile, although he had previously declared him to be a man of God; but he continued on terms of friendship with Eudoxius. When his impiety had been visited by a just sentence of deposition, he would not submit to the decision of the council, but continued to ordain bishops and presbyters, although he had himself been divested of the episcopal office. These are the events which occurred at Constantinople.








Copyright ©1999-2018 e-Catholic2000.com