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A History Of The Church In Five Books by Theodoret

EULALIUS was first ordained in place of Eustathius. But Eulalius, surviving his elevation only a short period, it was much desired that Eusebius, bishop of Palestine, should be translated to this bishopric. Eusebius, however, refused the appointment, and the emperor forbad its being conferred on him: the dignity, therefore, fell upon Euphonius, who died after a lapse of only one year and a few months, and was succeeded by Flacillus. All these bishops secretly clung to the Arian opinions. Hence it was, that most of those individuals, whether of the clergy or of the laity, who valued religion, left the churches and formed assemblies among themselves. They were called Eustathians, although it was after the banishment of Eustathius that they held their meetings. The wretched woman above-mentioned, was soon after attacked by a severe and protracted illness; and she then avowed the imposture in which she had been engaged, and made known the whole affair, not only to two or three, but to almost all the priests. She confessed that the accusation itself was untrue, but yet that her oath was not altogether false, as Eustathius the coppersmith was the father of the babe. Such were some of the crimes perpetrated in Antioch by that faction.








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