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A History Of The Church In Five Books by Theodoret

ON the death of Nectarius, the bishop of Constantinople, Arcadius, who governed that part of the empire, hearing that John, the great luminary of the world, had been ordained a presbyter in Antioch, sent for him, and ordered the bishops to install him as the pastor of the great city. This action alone is sufficient to evince the zeal of the emperor for religion. At this time Flavian was the bishop of Antioch. Elpidius, who had been the companion of the great Melitius, and who more closely resembled him in life and conversation than the wax resembles the impression of the seal, had succeeded to the government of the church of Laodicea, upon the death of Pelagius. The holy Marcellus was succeeded by the celebrated Agapetus, who had led a life of retirement during the time that the storms of persecution were raging. Maximus, a friend of John, was the bishop of Seleucia, a city situated near Mount Taurus; and Theodore was the bishop of Mopsuestia. They were both eminent as preachers. Acacius, celebrated for great prudence and sanctity of life, governed the church of Berœa, and Leontius, who was renowned for many virtues, ruled the church of Galatia.








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