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A History Of The Church In Five Books by Theodoret

AS soon as the death of Julian was known in Antioch, public festivals were celebrated. The victory of the cross was extolled, and the imposture of the oracles was ridiculed, not only in the churches and in the assemblies of the martyrs, but also in the theatres. I shall now record an admirable speech made by the citizens of Antioch, in order that it may be preserved in our memory. They all exclaimed with one voice, “Where now are thy predictions, O foolish Maximus? God and Christ have prevailed against thee.” This Maximus was a philosopher of that time, who was engaged in magical arts, and who boasted of being able to predict the future. Julian perceived very clearly the horror with which his evil and impure deeds were regarded by the inhabitants of Antioch; for they, having been instructed in the divine doctrines by Peter and by Paul, ardently loved the Lord of all and the Saviour. On this account, Julian wrote a book against them, entitled “Aversion to Beards.”

I shall conclude this book with this mention of the public rejoicings at the death of the tyrant. It would not be right to connect the reign of a pious prince with the sway of an impious tyrant.








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