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A Commentary On The Psalms From Primitive and Mediæval Writers Volumes 1 To 4 by Rev. J.M. Neale D.D.

a. Adults

1. Ps. 130, before the procession starts.

2. Ps. 51.

3. One or more Gradual Psalms, or Psalms from the Office of the Dead, during the procession.

4. The Psalms of the Office of the Dead, all three Nocturns and Lauds, said in the Church.

b. Children

1. Ps. 113.

2. Ps. 24.

3. Ps. 150, with Antiphon, Ps. 148:12–13.

These examples will suffice to show in what manner the Psalter is interwoven with the texture of the most important rites of the Church, (with the singular exception of Holy Orders, save that in the Roman rite for Consecration of Bishops, Ps. 84 may be, and Ps. 133 is used,) and Psalms, or portions of Psalms as versicles, are freely introduced into a multitude of minor offices which have not been set down here, but which the student may readily find for himself in the great collections of Assemani and other liturgiologists.








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