HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







A Commentary On The Psalms From Primitive and Mediæval Writers Volumes 1 To 4 by Rev. J.M. Neale D.D.

ARG. THOMAS. That CHRIST may instruct us with His precepts, statutes, and laws. The Voice of CHRIST to the FATHER, concerning the adversary, and the Jews, and His Advent, and Passion, and Resurrection. Of His judgment to come, and kingdom. Concerning advising one’s neighbour. I. Aleph. A Psalm set out concerning mystical doctrine. II. Beth. The voice of the new people and of young men recently believing in GOD. III. Gimel. The voice of the Confessors. The voice of the Confessors and of Penitents turning themselves from ignorance. IV. Daleth. The voice of seculars believing in GOD. V. He. The voice of monks living apart. VI. Vau. The voice of ruling priests. VII. Zain. The voice of a holy man sent amongst the ungodly. VIII. Heth. The voice of the Doctors, proclaiming the Judgment of GOD, and keeping watch. IX. Thet (sic.) The voice of the Saints living in tribulation, who are tried in adversity. X. Jod. The voice of Prelates, Confessors, and Virgins, believing in GOD. XI. Caph. The vows of penitent men. XII. Lamech (sic). The voice of clerics entering on a new grade. XIII. Mem. The voice of the doctors bringing forth the Law. XIV. Nun. XV. Samech. The voice of the righteous in temptation. XVI. Ain. The prayer of the faithful at the end of his departure. XVII. Phe. Perceiving words, giving thanks to GOD. XVIII. Sade (sic.) The supplication of one fainting amidst sinners. XIX. Coph. The voice of a Confessor labouring from his youth. XX. Res. Supplication of the poor set in sorrows. XXI. Sin. XXII. Tau.

VEN. BEDE. The desirable Alleluia is prefixed to this festival Psalm, very full of the virtue of divine things, that the merit of the divine song may be recognised by the honour of the title. In the Hebrew letters it is set forth for the instruction of the unlearned and teachable peoples of CHRIST in such order that every set of eight verses begins with one of each letter, wherein I think the mystery of the Resurrection and of true Circumcision is shown forth. Josephus in his books of Antiquities states that this Psalm, and the 144th (145) and the Song of Deuteronomy, were composed in elegiac metre: no doubt because the former verse consists of six feet, and the latter, less by one, ends in a pentameter. Throughout the whole Psalm the universal choir of the Saints speaks, whether they be those who were from the beginning of the world, who are now, or are expected to be hereafter; amongst whom are found Apostles, Prophets, Martyrs, Confessors, those of the ecclesiastical order, and all who serve the LORD in holy chastity. Because then under each letter the things which follow should be understood according to its meaning, therefore the first letter Aleph is rightly interpreted Doctrine, wherein eternal blessedness is promised to the undefiled in the way of the LORD. Blessed are those that are undefiled in the way, &c.

SYRIAC PSALTER. Anonymous. A principal meditation upon the excellency that is in GOD.

EUSEBIUS OF CÆSAREA. The rudiments of primary instruction according to GOD.

S. ATHANASIUS. A Psalm proclaiming blessedness. Also, Describing a life endowed with holy virtue.








Copyright ©1999-2016 e-Catholic2000.com