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A Commentary On The Psalms From Primitive and Mediæval Writers Volumes 1 To 4 by Rev. J.M. Neale D.D.

ARG. THOMAS. That CHRIST is the hope of all lands. The Voice of the Apostles with the praise of CHRIST. The Voice of the Prophet concerning the Apostles and the people. Truly the Voice of the Church. Of Baptism at length in the Passover. The Voice of the Church before Baptism.

VEN. BEDE. Since the first portions of the title are already remarked upon, we shall explain the latter in a few words. When the people of Israel had passed over into Chaldæa, the above-named Prophets foretold that they should return to their country after seventy years, and should restore, in a happier state, Jerusalem, which had been overthrown by the enemy. It does not follow that Jeremiah and Ezekiel composed the Psalm; but as it historically agrees with their date, it is prefaced with their names. Most authors assert that this was done by Ezra, saying that he fitted titles to all the Psalms, and collected them into one volume, as they had been unarranged and scattered, according to variety of authority and date, up to that time. Spiritually, the people which, leaving Babylon, hastened after the Captivity to Jerusalem, refers to them who, after past sin, and condemnation of the confusion of this world, emulously press into the Church of CHRIST. And to these the entire Psalm is, by the authority of the Fathers, to be adapted. That people which, abandoning the sins of the world, hath returned to the LORD, in the first opening of the Psalm, now free, acknowledging its Author, beseeches that its prayer may be heard, declaring the only happy man to be him that has succeeded in reaching His courts. The hymn befits Thee, O God, in Sion. In the second section it asserts the LORD to be the hope of all the ends of the earth, describing His power in varied praise by allegorical comparison, and saying that His Saints rejoice in Him with hymns of gladness. Hear us, O God of our salvation.

EUSEBIUS OF CÆSAREA. The Calling of the Gentiles.

S. ATHANASIUS. A Psalm with hymns.








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