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A Commentary On The Psalms From Primitive and Mediæval Writers Volumes 1 To 4 by Rev. J.M. Neale D.D.

ARG. THOMAS. That CHRIST corrects and emends us for our iniquity. The Prophet blames the Jews, who, having the riches of the Scriptures, know not to whom they leave them; and the Church upbraids them that heap up riches, and cannot tell who shall gather them. The Prophet blames those who have riches, and know not to whom they shall leave them. The voice of the just against his enemies.

VEN. BEDE. The name Idithun signifies that his choir sang this hymn. Now the name Idithun is,* by interpretation, He that leaps by them. It therefore signifies him who in his spirit passes by earthly things, and leaps by them that, cleaving fast to the ground, and bowed down to earth, have no thoughts save for those things that are most terrene; him that, dwelling in the lofty habitation of the mind, freely philosophises concerning the vanity of worldly occupations. And lest you should think that this, because it speaks of difficulty, is a Psalm of penitence, he adds, A song of David. Now a song sometimes pertains to them that are joyous, sometimes to them that mourn, but never has to do with them that are penitent. And note that those Psalms which are called in their titles songs, always celebrate the joys of victory in adversity.… This Idithun—he that leaps over vices, affording us the type of a righteous man—testifies from the first part of the Psalm how he, with much advantage, kept silence against the enemies that leapt upon him to attack him, asking to know the end of his life, if perchance he might merit to behold the Incarnation of the LORD, even with his bodily eyes: I said, I will take heed to my ways. Next, he proveth that the fear of mortals is vain, because all things are given into the power of the LORD: Surely man walketh. Thirdly, he maketh request that his sins may be forgiven, and that his life may be concluded with a happy end: Hear my prayer, O Lord.

SYRIAC PSALTER. A prayer and exhortation to refrain the tongue from evil words, and to set a guard over the sight and the other senses.








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