HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







A History Of The Mass And Its Ceremonies In The Eastern And Western Church -Rev John O'Brien A.M.

ACCORDING to the best liturgical writers, the custom of placing the Crucifix—that is, a cross with the image of our Lord crucified upon it—has been derived from the Apostles themselves. Mention is made of it by all the early Fathers, and, as we shall see a little further on, it has always been used by the Orientals (Bouvry, ii. 225; Kozma, 33). It is intended to remind all that in the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass the same Victim is offered which was offered on Calvary, but in an unbloody manner. “The Church omits nothing,” says Pope Benedict XIV., “to impress upon the minds of the priest and people that the Sacrifice of the altar and that of the Cross are the same” (Bouvry, ii. 22, note).

Whenever there is an exposition of the Blessed Sacrament it is recommended to take away the Crucifix as long as the reality is present; but, if this cannot be conveniently done, it is not insisted upon. In fact, every church is allowed to follow its own custom in this respect (De Herdt, i. 181).








Copyright ©1999-2016 e-Catholic2000.com