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A History Of The Mass And Its Ceremonies In The Eastern And Western Church -Rev John O'Brien A.M.

The Dominicans are so called from St. Dominic, a Spaniard by birth, who founded them in the year 1215. They are very generally known by the name of Friars Preachers from their peculiar mission. In England their general appellation is the Black Friars, on account of their wearing an overdress of a black color; when at home their habit is entirely white. Throughout France their familiar designation is Jacobites, from the fact that the principal house of their order in Paris was first known by the name of St. James, which in Latin is Jacobus.

Like the Carmelites and Carthusians, the Dominicans put the water and wine into the chalice before they begin Mass. They do not say the “Judica me, Deus,” but recite instead of it certain verses beginning with “Confitemini Domino quoniam bonus.” They say the opening words of the “Gloria in excelsis” at the middle of the altar, but return to the book at the Epistle side to finish the rest of it. Here also they say the “Dominus vobiscum.” They observe somewhat similar ceremonies in reciting the Credo. First they say “Credo in unum Deum” at the middle; then they return to the missal at the Gospel side, and continue reciting it there until the “Incarnatus est,” when they go to the middle again, and there, spreading out the anterior part of the chasuble on the altar, kneel so as to touch the ground at the “Homo factus est.” They extend the chasuble in like manner whenever the “Flectamus genua” is to be said. After the “Homo factus est” they return and finish the Credo at the book. They read the Offertorium at the Gospel side, after the manner of a collect, and make the oblation of the Host and chalice as the two fore-mentioned orders do. After the Gospel of St. John they make the sign of the cross upon themselves, and then go to the middle, where they fold up the corporal and put it in the burse, and afterwards return to the sacristy with the amice covering their head as at the beginning of Mass. They recite the “Benedicite” after Mass, as we do.








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