HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







A History Of The Mass And Its Ceremonies In The Eastern And Western Church -Rev John O'Brien A.M.

WE have said that in ancient times the Blessed Sacrament used to be kept in a golden dove suspended from the canopy of the altar. This was the way in which it was generally kept, and it was on this account that many of the ancient fathers used to designate the church by the appellation of “Domus Columbæ”—that is, the House of the Dove (Selvaggio, b. i. p. 1). Reference, of course, to the Holy Ghost, who is so often represented by a dove, is the ultimate intent of the expression.

The Church of Verona used to keep the Blessed Sacrament in an ivory vessel of costly workmanship (Martène, De Antiquis Ecclesiæ Ritibus), and this was the custom also with many British churches. Sometimes it was kept in a small tower, and sometimes in a neat little basket of delicate wicker-work, in allusion to the baskets that were used at the miraculous multiplication of the loaves by our Divine Lord. This latter way of keeping it was in vogue at Rome in the time of Pope Gregory XI., A.D. 1370 (ibid.)

In many of the Anglo-Saxon churches, whilst the custom prevailed of keeping the Blessed Sacrament in the golden dove, a sort of aureola, formed of very brilliant lights, used to surround it. In all cases a light burned before it day and night (Dr. Rock, Church of Our Fathers, vol. i. 200).








Copyright ©1999-2016 e-Catholic2000.com