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A History Of The Mass And Its Ceremonies In The Eastern And Western Church -Rev John O'Brien A.M.

The Paten is that small silver or gold dish, something like a saucer, which covers the month of the Chalice, and upon which the large bread for consecration is placed up to the Offertory. It is required to be of the same material as the Chalice, and to be perfectly plain on its concave surface (Bouvry, ii. 239).

In ancient times the Paten was much larger than now, for it was made to hold all the bread that was to be consecrated at Mass. Hence we must not be surprised when we hear or read of Patens which weighed twenty-five and thirty pounds (Bona, Rer. Liturg., 292; Kozma, 84).

Patens of the Orientals.—The Greeks call the Paten ἅγιος δίσκος, or holy tray. Theirs is much larger than ours, as must needs be to keep their large Particles from falling off, for their Hosts are not thin and flat like ours, but thick and square.








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