HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







A History Of The Mass And Its Ceremonies In The Eastern And Western Church -Rev John O'Brien A.M.

After the recital of the embolismus, or sequence of the “Pater noster,” the archdeacon who assisted at Episcopal Mass was accustomed, in early days, to turn round to the congregation and intone “Humiliate vos ad benedictionem”—“Bow down for the benediction; to which the rest of the clergy would respond, “Deo gratias.” Then the bishop, before he said “Pax Domini,” would turn to the people and impart his solemn blessing.

According to the Mozarabic Rite, this custom was also observed in Low Mass, and that by priests as well as by bishops. The fourth Council of Toledo, however, decreed that the custom should be abolished. The reason assigned by Mabillon (De Liturgiis Gallicanis, lib. i. cap. iv. Nos. 13 et 14) for this ceremony was that those who did not intend to communicate might leave the church. Hence the meaning of that invitation to depart mentioned by Pope Gregory the Great: “Si quis non communicat det locum”—“If any one does not intend to communicate let him make way.”








Copyright ©1999-2016 e-Catholic2000.com