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Fathers Of The Church
Catholic Edition

Fathers of the Third Century: Gregory Thaumaturgus, Dionysius the Great,
Julius Africanus, Anatolius, and Minor Writers, Methodius
, Arnobius

FATHERS OF THE THIRD CENTURY: GREGORY THAUMATURGUS, DIONYSIUS THE GREAT, JULIUS AFRICANUS, ANATOLIUS, AND MINOR WRITERS, METHODIUS, ARNOBIUs

ANTE-NICENE FATHERS VOLUME 6. GREGORY THAUMATURGUS, DIONYSIUS THE GREAT, JULIUS AFRICANUS, ANATOLIUS AND MINOR WRITERS, METHODIUS, ARNOBIUS.

FATHERS OF THE THIRD CENTURY: GREGORY THAUMATURGUS, DIONYSIUS THE GREAT, JULIUS AFRICANUS, ANATOLIUS AND MINOR WRITERS, METHODIUS, ARNOBIUS.

THE WRITINGS OF THE FATHERS DOWN TO A.D. 325






GREGORY THAUMATURGUS

Part I
Acknowledged Writings

Part II
Dubious or Spurious Writings

DIONYSIUS

The Works of Dionysius
Extant Fragments

Exegetical Fragments

JULIUS AFRICANUS

The Extant Writings of Julius Africanus

I
The Epistle to Aristides

II
Narrative of Events Happening in Persia on the Birth of Christ

III
The Extant Fragments of the Five Books of the Chronography of Julius Africanus

ANATOLIUS AND MINOR WRITERS

ANATOLIUS OF ALEXANDRIA

The Paschal Canon of Anatolius of Alexandria

ARCHELAUS

The Acts of the Disputation with the Heresiarch Manes

A Fragment of the Same Disputation

ALEXANDER OF LYCOPOLIS

Of the Manichaeans

PETER OF ALEXANDRIA

The Genuine Acts of Peter

The Canonical Epistle, With the Commentaries of Theodore Balsamon and John Zonaras

Fragments from the Writings of Peter

ALEXANDER OF ALEXANDRIA

Epistles on the Arian Heresy And the Deposition of Arius

METHODIUS

The Banquet of the Ten Virgins; Or, Concerning Chastity

Concerning Free-Will

From the Discourse on the Resurrection

Fragments

Oration Concerning Simeon and Anna On the Day that They Met in the Temple

Oration on the Palms

Three Fragments from the Homily on the Cross and Passion of Christ

Some Other Fragments of the Same Methodius

Two Fragments, Uncertain

ARNOBIUS

The Seven Books of Arnobius Against the Heathen
(Adversus Gentes.)






GREGORY THAUMATURGUS

Part I
Acknowledged Writings

A Declaration of Faith

A Metaphrase of the Book of Ecclesiastes

Chapter I

Chapter II

Chapter III

Chapter IV

Chapter V

Chapter VI

Chapter VII

Chapter VIII

Chapter IX

Chapter X

Chapter XI

Chapter XII

Canonical Epistle

Canon I

Canon II

Canon III

Canon IV

Canon V

Canon VI

Canon VII

Canon VIII

Canon IX

Canon X

Canon XI

The Oration and Panegyric Addressed to Origen

Argument I.
For Eight Years Gregory Has Given Up the Practice of Oratory, Being Busied with the Study Chiefly of Roman Law and the Latin Language

Argument II.
He Essays to Speak of the Well-Nigh Divine Endowments of Origen in His Presence, into Whose Hands He Avows Himself to Have Been Led in a Way Beyond All His Expectation

Argument III.
He is Stimulated to Speak of Him by the Longing of a Grateful Mind. To the Utmost of His Ability He Thinks He Ought to Thank Him. From God are the Beginnings of All Blessings; And to Him Adequate Thanks Cannot Be Returned

Argument IV.
The Son Alone Knows How to Praise the Father Worthily. In Christ and by Christ Our Thanksgivings Ought to Be Rendered to the Father. Gregory Also Gives Thanks to His Guardian Angel, Because He Was Conducted by Him to Origen

Argument V.
ere Gregory Interweaves the Narrative of His Former Life. His Birth of Heathen Parents is Stated. In the Fourteenth Year of His Age He Loses His Father. He is Dedicated to the Study of Eloquence and Law. By a Wonderful Leading of Providence, He is Brought to Origen

Argument VI.
The Arts by Which Origen Studies to Keep Gregory and His Brother Athenodorus with Him, Although It Was Almost Against Their Will; And the Love by Which Both are Taken Captive. Of Philosophy, the Foundation of Piety, with the View of Giving Himself Therefore Wholly to that Study, Gregory is Willing to Give Up Fatherland, Parents, the Pursuit of Law, and Every Other Discipline. Of the Soul as the Free Principle. The Nobler Part Does Not Desire to Be United with the Inferior, But the Inferior with the Nobler

Argument VII.
he Wonderful Skill with Which Origen Prepares Gregory and Athenodorus for Philosophy. The Intellect of Each is Exercised First in Logic, and the Mere Attention to Words is Contemned

Argument VIII.
hen in Due Succession He Instructs Them in Physics, Geometry, and Astronomy

Argument IX.
But He Imbues Their Minds, Above All, with Ethical Science; And He Does Not Confine Himself to Discoursing on the Virtues in Word, But He Rather Confirms His Teaching by His Acts

Argument X.
Hence the Mere Word-Sages are Confuted, Who Say and Yet Act Not

Argument XI.
Origen is the First and the Only One that Exhorts Gregory to Add to His Acquirements the Study of Philosophy, and Offers Him in a Certain Manner an Example in Himself. Of Justice, Prudence, Temperance, and Fortitude. The Maxim, Know Thyself

Argument XII.
Gregory Disallows Any Attainment of the Virtues on His Part. Piety is Both the Beginning and the End, and Thus It is the Parent of All the Virtues

Argument XIII.
The Method Which Origen Used in His Theological and Metaphysical Instructions. He Commends the Study of All Writers, the Atheistic Alone Excepted. The Marvellous Power of Persuasion in Speech. The Facility of the Mind in Giving Its Assent

Argument XIV.
Whence the Contentions of Philosophers Have Sprung. Against Those Who Catch at Everything that Meets Them, and Give It Credence, and Cling to It. Origen Was in the Habit of Carefully Reading and Explaining the Books of the Heathen to His Disciples

Argument XV.
The Case of Divine Matters. Only God and His Prophets are to Be Heard in These. The Prophets and Their Auditors are Acted on by the Same Afflatus. Origen’s Excellence in the Interpretation of Scripture

Argument XVI.
Gregory Laments His Departure Under a Threefold Comparison; Likening It to Adam’s Departure Out of Paradise. To the Prodigal Son’s Abandonment of His Father’s House, and to the Deportation of the Jews into Babylon

Argument XVII.
Gregory Consoles Himself

Argument XVIII.
Peroration, and Apology for the Oration

Argument XIX.
Apostrophe to Origen, and Therewith the Leave-Taking, and the Urgent Utterance of Prayer

Part II
Dubious or Spurious Writings

A Sectional Confession of Faith

I

II

III

IV

V

VI

VII

VIII

IX

X

XI

XII

XIII

XIV

XV

XVI

XVII

XVIII

XIX

XX

XXI

XXII

XXIII

On the Trinity

Fragment from the Discourse

Twelve Topics on the Faith

Topic I

Topic II

Topic III

Topic IV

Topic V

Topic VI

Topic VII

Topic VIII

Topic IX

Topic X

Topic XI

Topic XII

On the Subject of the Soul

I
Wherein is the Criterion for the Apprehension of the Soul

II
Whether the Soul Exists

III
Whether the Soul is a Substance

IV
Whether the Soul is Incorporeal

V
Whether the Soul is Simple or Compound

VI
Whether Our Soul is Immortal

VII
Whether Our Soul is Rational

Four Homilies

The First Homily
On the Annunciation to the Holy Virgin Mary

The Second Homily
On the Annunciation to the Holy Virgin Mary

The Third Homily
On the Annunciation to the Holy Virgin Mary

The Fourth Homily
On the Holy Theophany, or on Christ’s Baptism

On All the Saints

On the Gospel According to Matthew

DIONYSIUS

The Works of Dionysius
Extant Fragments

Part I
Containing Various Sections of the Works

I
From the Two Books on the Promises

II
From the Books on Nature

II
Refutation of This Dogma on the Ground of Familiar Human Analogies

III
Refutation on the Ground of the Constitution of the Universe

IV
A Refutation of the Same on the Grounds of the Human Constitution

V
That to Work is Not a Matter of Pain and Weariness to God

III
From the Books Against Sabellius. On the Notion that Matter is Ungenerated

IV
Epistle to Dionysius Bishop of Rome

V
The Epistle to Bishop Basilides

Canon I

Canon II

Canon III

Canon IV

Part II
Containing Epistles, or Fragments of Epistles

Epistle I
To Domitius and Didymus

Epistle II
To Novatus

Epistle III
To Fabius, Bishop of Antioch

Epistle IV
To Cornelius the Roman Bishop

Epistle V
Which is the First on the Subject of Baptism Addressed to Stephen, Bishop of Rome

Epistle VI
To Sixtus, Bishop

Epistle VII
To Philemon, a Presbyter

Epistle VIII
To Dionysius

Epistle IX
To Sixtus II

Epistle X
Against Bishop Germanus

Epistle XI
To Hermammon

Epistle XII
To the Alexandrians

Epistle XIII
To Hierax, a Bishop in Egypt

Epistle XIV
From His Fourth Festival Epistle

Exegetical Fragments

I
A Commentary on the Beginning of Ecclesiastes

Chapter I

Chapter II

Chapter III

II
The Gospel According to Luke

III
On Luke XXII. 42, Etc

IV
An Exposition of Luke XXII. 46, Etc

V
On John VIII. 12

VI
Of the One Substance

VII
On the Reception of the Lapsed to Penitence

JULIUS AFRICANUS

The Extant Writings of Julius Africanus

I
The Epistle to Aristides

I

II

III

II
Narrative of Events Happening in Persia on the Birth of Christ

III
The Extant Fragments of the Five Books of the Chronography of Julius Africanus

I
On the Mythical Chronology of the Egyptians and Chaldeans

II

III

IV
On the Deluge

V

VI

VII

VIII
Of Abraham

IX
Of Abraham and Lot

X
Of the Patriarch Jacob

XI

XII

XIII

XIV

XV

XVI
On the Seventy Weeks of Daniel

XVII
On the Fortunes of Hyrcanus and Antigonus, and on Herod, Augustus, Antony, and Cleopatra, in Abstract

XVIII
On the Circumstances Connected with Our Saviour’s Passion and His Life-Giving Resurrection

XIX
For we who both know the measure of those words, and are not ignorant of the grace of faith, give thanks to the Father, who has bestowed on us His creatures Jesus Christ the Saviour of all, and our Lord; to whom be glory and majesty, with the Holy Spirit, for ever

IV
The Passion of St. Symphorosa and Her Seven Sons

ANATOLIUS AND MINOR WRITERS

ANATOLIUS OF ALEXANDRIA

The Paschal Canon of Anatolius of Alexandria

I

II

III

IV

V

VI

VII

VIII

IX

X

XI

XII

XIII

XIV

XV

XVI

XVII

Fragments of the Books on Arithmetic

ALEXANDER OF CAPPADOCIA

From the Epistles of Alexander

I. An Epistle to the People of Antioch

II. From an Epistle to the Antinoites

III. From an Epistle to Origen

IV. From an Epistle to Demetrius, Bishop of Alexandria

THEOGNOSTUS OF ALEXANDRIA

From His Seven Books of Hypotyposes or Outlines

I

II

III

PIERUS OF ALEXANDRIA

I
A Fragment of a Work of Pierius on the First Epistle of Paul to the Corinthians

II
A Section on the Writings of Pierius

THEONAS OF ALEXANDRIA

The Epistle of Theonas, Bishop of Alexandria, to Lucianus, the Chief Chamberlain

I

II

III

IV

V

VI

VII

VIII

IX

PHILEAS

Fragments of the Epistle of Phileas to the People of Thmuis

I

II

III

The Epistle of the Same Phileas of Thmuis to Meletius, Bishop of Lycopolis

The Beginning of the Epistle of the Bishops

The Conclusion of the Epistle of the Bishops

PAMPHILUS

An Exposition of the Chapters of the Acts of the Apostles

MALCHION

I
The Epistle Written by Malchion,

II
Fragments Apparently of the Same Epistle of the Synod of Antioch;

III
From the Acts of the Disputation Conducted by Malchion Against Paul of Samosata

IV
A Point in the Same Disputation

ARCHELAUS

The Acts of the Disputation with the Heresiarch Manes

A Fragment of the Same Disputation

ALEXANDER OF LYCOPOLIS

Of the Manichaeans

Chapter I
The Excellence of the Christian Philosophy; The Origin of Heresies Amongst Christians

Chapter II
The Age of Manichaeus, or Manes; His First Disciples; The Two Principles; Manichaean Matter

Chapter III
The Fancies of Manichaeus Concerning Matter

Chapter IV
The Moon’s Increase and Wane; The Manichaean Trifling Respecting It; Their Dreams About Man and Christ; Their Foolish System of Abstinence

Chapter V
The Worship of the Sun and Moon Under God; Support Sought for the Manichaeans in the Grecian Fables; The Authority of the Scriptures and Faith Despised by the Manichaeans

Chapter VI
The Two Principles of the Manichaeans; Themselves Controverted; The Pythagorean Opinion Respecting First Principles; Good and Evil Contrary; The Victory on the Side of Good

Chapter VII
Motion Vindicated from the Charge of Irregularity; Circular; Straight; Of Generation and Corruption; Of Alteration, and Quality Affecting Sense

Chapter VIII
Is Matter Wicked? Of God and Matter

Chapter IX
The Ridiculous Fancies of the Manichaeans About the Motion of Matter Towards God; God the Author of the Rebellion of Matter in the Manichaean Sense; The Longing of Matter for Light and Brightness Good; Divine Good None the Less for Being Communicated

Chapter X
The Mythology Respecting the Gods; The Dogmas of the Manichaeans Resemble This: the Homeric Allegory of the Battle of the Gods; Envy and Emulation Existing In God According to the Manichaean Opinion; These Vices are to Be Found in No Good Man, and are to Be Accounted Disgraceful

Chapter XI
The Transmitted Virtue of the Manichaeans; The Virtues of Matter Mixed with Equal or Less Amount of Evil

Chapter XII
The Destruction of Evil by the Immission of Virtue Rejected; Because from It Arises No Diminution of Evil; Zeno’s Opinion Discarded, that the World Will Be Burnt Up by Fire from the Sun

Chapter XIII
Evil by No Means Found in the Stars and Constellations; All the Evils of Life Vain in the Manichaean Opinion, Which Bring on the Extinction of Life; Their Fancy Having Been Above Explained Concerning the Transportation of Souls from the Moon to the Sun

Chapter XIV
Noxious Animals Worshipped by the Egyptians; Man by Arts an Evil-Doer; Lust and Injustice Corrected by Laws and Discipline; Contingent and Necessary Things in Which There is No Stain

Chapter XV
The Lust and Desire of Sentient Things; Demons; Animals Sentient; So Also the Sun and the Moon and Stars; The Platonic Doctrine, Not the Christian

Chapter XVI
Because Some are Wise, Nothing Prevents Others from Being So; Virtue is to Be Acquired by Diligence and Study; By a Sounder Philosophy Men are to Be Carried Onwards to the Good; The Common Study of Virtue Has by Christ Been Opened Up to All

Chapter XVII
The Manichaean Idea of Virtue in Matter Scouted; If One Virtue Has Been Created Immaterial, the Rest are Also Immaterial; Material Virtue an Exploded Notion

Chapter XVIII
Dissolution and Inherence According to the Manichaeans; This is Well Put, Ad Hominem, with Respect to Manes, Who is Himself in Matter

Chapter XIX
The Second Virtue of the Manichaeans Beset with the Former, and with New Absurdities; Virtue, Active and Passive, the Fashioner of Matter, and Concrete with It; Bodies Divided by Manichaeus into Three Parts

Chapter XX
The Divine Virtue in the View of the Same Manichaeus Corporeal and Divisible; The Divine Virtue Itself Matter Which Becomes Everything; This is Not Fitting

Chapter XXI
Some Portions of the Virtue Have Good in Them, Others More Good; In the Sun and the Moon It is Incorrupt, in Other Things Depraved; An Improbable Opinion

Chapter XXII
The Light of the Moon from the Sun; The Inconvenience of the Opinion that Souls are Received in It; The Two Deluges of the Greeks

Chapter XXIII
The Image of Matter in the Sun, After Which Man is Formed; Trifling Fancies; It is a Mere Fancy, Too, that Man Is Formed from Matter; Man is Either a Composite Being, or a Soul, or Mind and Understanding

Chapter XXIV
Christ is Mind, According to the Manichaeans; What is He in the View of the Church? Incongruity in Their Idea of Christ; That He Suffered Only in Appearance, a Dream of the Manichaeans; Nothing is Attributed to the Word by Way of Fiction

Chapter XXV
The Manichaean Abstinence from Living Things Ridiculous; Their Madness in Abhorring Marriage; The Mythology of the Giants; Too Allegorical an Exposition

Chapter XXVI
The Much-Talked-of Fire of the Manichaeans; That Fire Matter Itself

PETER OF ALEXANDRIA

The Genuine Acts of Peter

The Canonical Epistle, With the Commentaries of Theodore Balsamon and John Zonaras

Canon I

Canon II

Canon III

Canon IV

Canon V

Canon VI

Canon VII

Canon VIII

Canon IX

Canon X

Canon XI

Canon XII

Canon XIII

Canon XIV

Canon XV

Fragments from the Writings of Peter

I
Letter to the Church at Alexandria

II
On the Godhead

III
On the Advent of Our Saviour

IV
On the Sojourning of Christ with Us

V
That Up to the Time of the Destruction of Jerusalem, the Jews Rightly Appointed the Fourteenth Day of the First Lunar Month

VI
Of the Soul and Body

VII
Fragment

VIII
On St. Matthew

IX
From a Sermon

The Roman Emperors

ALEXANDER OF ALEXANDRIA

Epistles on the Arian Heresy And the Deposition of Arius

I
To Alexander, Bishop of the City of Constantinople

II
Epistle Catholic

III
Epistle

IV
Epistle to AEglon, Bishop of Cynopolis, Against the Arians

V
On the Soul and Body and the Passion of the Lord

VI
The Addition in the Codex, with a Various Reading

METHODIUS

The Banquet of the Ten Virgins; Or, Concerning Chastity

Discourse I
Marcella

Chapter I
The Difficulty and Excellence of Virginity; The Study of Doctrine Necessary for Virgins

Chapter II
Virginity a Plant from Heaven, Introduced Late; The Advancement of Mankind to Perfection, How Arranged

Chapter III
By the Circumcision of Abraham, Marriage with Sisters Forbidden; In the Times of the Prophets Polygamy Put a Stop To; Conjugal Purity Itself by Degrees Enforced

Chapter IV
Christ Alone Taught Virginity, Openly Preaching the Kingdom of Heaven; The Likeness of God to Be Attained in the Light of the Divine Virtues

Chapter V
Christ, by Preserving His Flesh Incorrupt in Virginity, Draws to the Exercise of Virginity; The Small Number of Virgins in Proportion to the Number of Saints

Discourse II
Theophila

Chapter I
Marriage Not Abolished by the Commendation of Virginity

Chapter II
Generation Something Akin to the First Formation of Eve from the Side and Nature of Adam; God the Creator of Men in Ordinary Generation

Chapter III
An Ambiguous Passage of Scripture; Not Only the Faithful But Even Prelates Sometimes Illegitimate

Chapter IV
Human Generation, and the Work of God Therein Set Forth

Chapter V
The Holy Father Follows Up the Same Argument

Chapter VI
God Cares Even for Adulterous Births; Angels Given to Them as Guardians

Chapter VII
The Rational Soul from God Himself; Chastity Not the Only Good, Although the Best and Most Honoured

Discourse III
Thaleia

Chapter I
Passages of Holy Scripture Compared

Chapter II
The Digressions of the Apostle Paul; The Character of His Doctrine: Nothing in It Contradictory; Condemnation of Origen, Who Wrongly Turns Everything into Allegory

Chapter III
Comparison Instituted Between the First and Second Adam

Chapter IV
Some Things Here Hard and Too Slightly Treated, and Apparently Not Sufficiently Brought Out According to the Rule of Theology

Chapter V
A Passage of Jeremiah Examined

Chapter VI
The Whole Number of Spiritual Sheep; Man a Second Choir, After the Angels, to the Praise of God; The Parable of the Lost Sheep Explained

Chapter VII
The Works of Christ, Proper to God and to Man, the Works of Him Who is One

Chapter VIII
The Bones and Flesh of Wisdom; The Side Out of Which the Spiritual Eve is Formed, the Holy Spirit; The Woman the Help-Meet of Adam; Virgins Betrothed to Christ

Chapter IX
The Dispensation of Grace in Paul the Apostle

Chapter X
The Doctrine of the Same Apostle Concerning Purity

Chapter XI
The Same Argument

Chapter XII
Paul an Example to Widows, and to Those Who Do Not Live with Their Wives

Chapter XIII
The Doctrine of Paul Concerning Virginity Explained

Chapter XIV
Virginity a Gift of God: the Purpose of Virginity Not Rashly to Be Adopted by Any One

Discourse IV
Theopatra

Chapter I
The Necessity of Praising Virtue, for Those Who Have the Power

Chapter II
The Protection of Chastity and Virginity Divinely Given to Men, that They May Emerge from the Mire of Vices

Chapter III
That Passage of David Explained; What the Harps Hung Upon the Willows Signify; The Willow a Symbol of Chastity; The Willows Watered by Streams

Chapter IV
The Author Goes on with the Interpretation of the Same Passage

Chapter V
The Gifts of Virgins, Adorned with Which They are Presented to One Husband, Christ

Chapter VI
Virginity to Be Cultivated and Commended in Every Place and Time

Discourse V
Thallousa

Chapter I
The Offering of Chastity a Great Gift

Chapter II
Abraham’s Sacrifice of a Heifer Three Years Old, of a Goat, and of a Ram Also Three Years Old: Its Meaning; Every Age to Be Consecrated to God; The Threefold Watch and Our Age

Chapter III
Far Best to Cultivate Virtue from Boyhood

Chapter IV
Perfect Consecration and Devotion to God: What It is

Chapter V
The Vow of Chastity, and Its Rites in the Law; Vines, Christ, and the Devil

Chapter VI
Sikera, a Manufactured and Spurious Wine, Yet Intoxicating; Things Which are Akin to Sins are to Be Avoided by a Virgin; The Altar of Incense (a Symbol Of) Virgins

Chapter VII
The Church Intermediate Between the Shadows of the Law and the Realities of Heaven

Chapter VIII
The Double Altar, Widows and Virgins; Gold the Symbol of Virginity

Discourse VI
Agathe

Chapter I
The Excellence of the Abiding Glory of Virginity; The Soul Made in the Image of the Image of God, that is of His Son; The Devil a Suitor for the Soul

Chapter II
The Parable of the Ten Virgins

Chapter III
The Same Endeavour and Effort After Virginity, with a Different Result

Chapter IV
What the Oil in the Lamps Means

Chapter V
The Reward of Virginity

Discourse VII
Procilla

Chapter I
What the True and Seemly Manner of Praising; The Father Greater Than the Son, Not in Substance, But in Order; Virginity the Lily; Faithful Souls and Virgins, the One Bride of the One Christ

Chapter II
The Interpretation of that Passage of the Canticles

Chapter III
Virgins Being Martyrs First Among the Companions of Christ

Chapter IV
The Passage Explained; The Queens, the Holy Souls Before the Deluge; The Concubines, the Souls of the Prophets; The Divine Seed for Spiritual Offspring in the Books of the Prophets; The Nuptials of the Word in the Prophets as Though Clandestine

Chapter V
The Sixty Queens: Why Sixty, and Why Queens; The Excellence of the Saints of the First Age

Chapter VI
The Eighty Concubines, What; The Knowledge of the Incarnation Communicated to the Prophets

Chapter VII
The Virgins, the Righteous Ancients; The Church, the One Only Spouse, More Excellent Than the Others

Chapter VIII
The Human Nature of Christ His One Dove

Chapter IX
The Virgins Immediately After the Queen and Spouse

Discourse VIII
Thekla

Chapter I
Methodius’ Derivation of the Word Virginity: Wholly Divine; Virtue, in Greek—arete, Whence So Called

Chapter II
The Lofty Mind and Constancy of the Sacred Virgins; The Introduction of Virgins into the Blessed Abodes Before Others

Chapter III
The Lot and Inheritance of Virginity

Chapter IV
Exhortation to the Cultivation of Virginity; A Passage from the Apocalypse is Proposed to Be Examined

Chapter V
The Woman Who Brings Forth, to Whom the Dragon is Opposed, the Church; Her Adornment and Grace

Chapter VI
The Works of the Church, the Bringing Forth of Children in Baptism; The Moon in Baptism, the Full Moon of Christ’s Passion

Chapter VII
The Child of the Woman in the Apocalypse Not Christ, But the Faithful Who are Born in the Laver

Chapter VIII
The Faithful in Baptism Males, Configured to Christ; The Saints Themselves Christs

Chapter IX
The Son of God, Who Ever Is, is To-Day Begotten in the Minds and Sense of the Faithful

Chapter X
The Dragon, the Devil; The Stars Struck from Heaven by the Tail of the Dragon, Heretics; The Numbers of the Trinity, that Is, the Persons Numbered; Errors Concerning Them

Chapter XI
The Woman with the Male Child in the Wilderness the Church; The Wilderness Belongs to Virgins and Saints; The Perfection of Numbers and Mysteries; The Equality and Perfection of the Number Six; The Number Six Related to Christ; From This Number, Too, the Creation and Harmony of the World Completed

Chapter XII
Virgins are Called to the Imitation of the Church in the Wilderness Overcoming the Dragon

Chapter XIII
The Seven Crowns of the Beast to Be Taken Away by Victorious Chastity; The Ten Crowns of the Dragon, the Vices Opposed to the Decalogue; The Opinion of Fate the Greatest Evil

Chapter XIV
The Doctrine of Mathematicians Not Wholly to Be Despised, When They are Concerned About the Knowledge of the Stars; The Twelve Signs of the Zodiac Mythical Names

Chapter XV
Arguments from the Novelty of Fate and Generation; That Golden Age, Early Men; Solid Arguments Against the Mathematicians

Chapter XVI
Several Other Things Turned Against the Same Mathematicians

Chapter XVII
The Lust of the Flesh and Spirit: Vice and Virtue

Discourse IX
Tusiane

Chapter I
Chastity the Chief Ornament of the True Tabernacle; Seven Days Appointed to the Jews for Celebrating the Feast of Tabernacles: What They Signify; The Sum of This Septenary Uncertain; Not Clear to Any One When the Consummation of the World Will Be; Even Now the Fabric of the World Completed

Chapter II
Figure, Image, Truth: Law, Grace, Glory; Man Created Immortal: Death Brought in by Destructive Sin

Chapter III
How Each One Ought to Prepare Himself for the Future Resurrection

Chapter IV
The Mind Clearer When Cleansed from Sin; The Ornaments of the Mind and the Order of Virtue; Charity Deep and Full; Chastity the Last Ornament of All; The Very Use of Matrimony to Be Restrained

Chapter V
The Mystery of the Tabernacles

Discourse X
Domnina

Chapter I
Chastity Alone Aids and Effects the Most Praiseworthy Government of the Soul

Chapter II
The Allegory of the Trees Demanding a King, in the Book of Judges, Explained

Chapter III
The Bramble and the Agnos the Symbol of Chastity; The Four Gospels, that Is, Teachings or Laws, Instructing to Salvation

Chapter IV
The Law Useless for Salvation; The Last Law of Chastity Under the Figure of the Bramble

Chapter V
The Malignity of the Devil as an Imitator in All Things; Two Kinds of Fig-Trees and Vines

Chapter VI
The Mystery of the Vision of Zechariah

Discourse XI
Arete

Chapter I
The True and Chaste Virgins Few; Chastity a Contest; Thekla Chief of Virgins

Chapter II
Thekla Singing Decorously a Hymn, the Rest of the Virgins Sing with Her; John the Baptist a Martyr to Chastity; The Church the Spouse of God, Pure and Virgin

Chapter III
Which are the Better, the Continent, or Those Who Delight in Tranquillity of Life? Contests the Peril of Chastity: the Felicity of Tranquillity; Purified and Tranquil Minds Gods: They Who Shall See God; Virtue Disciplined by Temptations

Concerning Free-Will

From the Discourse on the Resurrection

Part I

Part II

Part III

Fragments

On the History of Jonah

Extracts from the Work on Things Created

From the Works of Methodius Against Porphyry

From His Discourse Concerning Martyrs

Oration Concerning Simeon and Anna On the Day that They Met in the Temple

Oration on the Palms

Three Fragments from the Homily on the Cross and Passion of Christ

I

II

III

Some Other Fragments of the Same Methodius

I

II

III

IV

V

VI. The Same Methodius

VII. The Same Methodius

VIII. The Same Methodius

IX. The Same Methodius

Two Fragments, Uncertain

ARNOBIUS

The Seven Books of Arnobius Against the Heathen
(Adversus Gentes.)

Book I

Book II

Book III

Book IV

Book V

Book VI

Book VII

Appendix








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