HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







An Ecclesiastical History To The 20th Year Of The Reign Of Constantine by Eusebius

SO great a persecution was then commenced against our faith, in most places, that Plinius Secundus, one of the most distinguished governors, moved by the number of martyrs, communicated with the emperor respecting the multitudes that were put to death for their faith. At the same time he informed him, that as far as he had ascertained, they did nothing wicked or contrary to the laws; except that they rose with the morning sun, and sang a hymn to Christ as to a god; but that adultery, and murder, and criminal excesses like these, were totally abhorred by them: and that in all things they acted according to the laws. To this Trajan, in reply, issued a decree, the purport of which was, that no search should be made after those that were Christians, but when they presented themselves they should be punished. On this, the persecution in some measure seemed abated, in its extreme violence, but there were no less pretexts left for those that wished to harass us. Sometimes the people, sometimes the rulers of different places, would waylay us to ensnare us; so that without an open persecution, there were partial persecutions in the provinces, and many of the faithful endured martyrdoms of various kinds. We have taken the account from the Apology of Tertullian, in Latin, mentioned above, of which the translation is as follows: “And indeed,” says he, “we have found that the inquisition against us is prohibited. For Plinius Secundus, who was governor of the province, having condemned certain Christians, and deprived them of their dignity, was confounded by the great number, and in doubt what course he should pursue. He communicated, therefore, the fact to Trajan the emperor, saying, that with the exception of their not being willing to sacrifice, he found nothing criminal in them. He stated also this, that the Christians arose with the sun, and sang to Christ as to a god; and that for the purpose of maintaining their discipline, they prohibited adultery, murder, over-reaching, fraud, and all crimes like them. To this Trajan wrote in reply, that the Christians should not be inquired after, but when they presented themselves they should be punished.” And such were the circumstances attending these events.








Copyright ©1999-2016 e-Catholic2000.com