HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







An Ecclesiastical History To The 20th Year Of The Reign Of Constantine by Eusebius

IN the third epistle on baptism, which Dionysius wrote to Philemon, a presbyter of Rome, he relates the following circumstances: “I perused,” says he, “the works and traditions of the heretics, defiling my mind for a little with their execrable sentiments; but I have also derived this benefit from them, viz., to refute them in my own mind, and to feel the greater disgust at them. And when a certain brother of the presbyters attempted to restrain me, and was much in dread lest I should be carried away by this sink of iniquity, saying, that my mind would be corrupted, in which he spoke the truth, as I thought, I was confirmed in my purpose by a vision sent me from heaven, when a voice came to me and commanded me in words as follows: ‘Read all that thou takest in hand, for thou art qualified to correct and prove all, and this very thing has been the cause of thy faith in Christ from the beginning.’ I received the vision, as coinciding with the apostolic declaration, which says to the more competent, ‘Be ye skilful money-changers.’ ”

Then, after some remarks on all the heresies, he adds:

“This rule and form I have received from our father (παπα) the blessed Heraclas, that those who come from the heretics (although they had apostatized from the church, or rather had not apostatized, but, seeming to have communion with the brethren, had been reported as frequenting some one of those who taught strange doctrines), after they had been expelled from the church, were not admitted again by him, though they entreated much, until they had publicly declared all that they had heard from their adversaries; and then indeed he admitted them to commune, without deeming another baptism necessary for them. For they had already before received the Holy Spirit from him.” But after agitating the question again considerably, he adds: “I have also understood, not only that this practice was introduced by those of Africa, but that long since, during the times of those bishops before us, in the most populous churches, the same thing was decreed by the councils of the brethren at Iconium and Synada. To overturn their determinations, and to drive them into contention and strife, I cannot endure, for thou shalt not remove, as it is said, the landmarks of thy neighbour, which thy fathers have placed.” His fourth epistle, On Baptism, was written to Dionysius at Rome, who was then a presbyter, but ere long was ordained bishop of that church. From this it is evident, that this same Dionysius of Rome was a learned and excellent man, as it is proved by the Dionysius of Alexandria. He wrote to him, among other matters, respecting the affairs of novatus, as follows.








Copyright ©1999-2018 e-Catholic2000.com