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An Ecclesiastical History To The 20th Year Of The Reign Of Constantine by Eusebius

OF Clement there are, in all, eight books extant, called Stromata, to which he has prefixed the following title: “Stromata of Commentaries, by Titus Flavius Clement, on the Knowledge of the True Philosophy.”

Equal in number to these, are the books that go under the title of Hypotyposes, or Institutions. In these, he also mentions Pantænus by name, as his teacher, giving the opinions that he expressed, and traditions that he had received from him. There is also a book of exhortation, addressed by him to the Greeks. Also, one entitled the Pedagogue, and another with the title, “What Rich Man may be saved?” A work also on the Passover. Discussions also on Fasting and Detraction. An Exhortation, also, to Patience, or an Address to the New Converts (Neophytes). A work also, with the title, Ecclesiastical Canon, or an Address to the Judaizing (Christians), which he dedicated to the above-mentioned bishop Alexander. In these Stromata, he has not only spread out the divine Scriptures (made a spreading), but he also quotes from the Gentiles where he finds any useful remark with them, elucidating many opinions held by the multitude both among the Greeks and barbarians. Moreover, he refutes the false opinions of the heresiarchs. He also reviews a great point of history, in which he presents materials of great variety of learning. With all these he intermixes the opinions of philosophers; whence, in all probability, he took the title of Stromata, as corresponding to the materials (of his book). In these he also makes use of testimony from the Antilegomenoi, the disputed Scriptures; also from that book called the Wisdom of Solomon, and that of Jesus the son of Sirach; also the Epistle to the Hebrews, that of Barnabas, and Clement, and Jude. He mentions also the work of Tatian against the Greeks; Cassian, also, who wrote a history of the times in chronological order. Moreover, he mentions the Jewish authors Philo, and Aristobulus, Josephus, and Demetrius, and Eupolemus, as all of these in their works prove, that Moses and the Jewish nation are much older than the earliest origin of the Greeks. The works of this writer here mentioned, also abound in a great variety of other learning. In the first of these he speaks of himself as being the next that succeeded the Apostles, and he promises in his works, also, to write a commentary on Genesis; also in his treatise on the Passover, he acknowledges that for the benefit of posterity, he was urged by his friends to commit to writing those traditions that he had heard from the ancient presbyters. He mentions, also, Melito and Irenæus, and others, some of whose narratives he also gives.








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