HOME CHAT NAB PRAYERS FORUMS COMMUNITY RCIA MAGAZINE CATECHISM LINKS CONTACT
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC SAINTS INDEX  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 CATHOLIC DICTIONARY  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Home
 
Bible
 
Catechism
 
Chat
 
Catholic Encyclopedia
 
Church Fathers
 
Classics Library
 
Church Documents
 
Discussion
 
Mysticism
 
Prayer
 
Prayer Requests
 
RCIA
 
Vocations
 
Ray of Hope
 
Saints
 
Social Doctrine
 
Links
 
Contact
 







An Ecclesiastical History To The 20th Year Of The Reign Of Constantine by Eusebius

MANY miracles are attributed to Narcissus by his countrymen, as they received the tradition handed down from the brethren. Among these they relate a wonderful event like the following. About the great watch of the passover, they say, that whilst the deacons were keeping the vigils the oil failed them; upon which all the people being very much dejected, Narcissus commanded the men that managed the lights to draw water from a neighbouring well, and to bring it to him. They having done it as soon as said, Narcissus prayed over the water, and then commanded them in a firm faith in Christ, to pour it into the lamps. When they had also done this, contrary to all natural expectation, by an extraordinary and divine influence, the nature of the water was changed into the quality of oil, and by most of the brethren a small quantity was preserved from that time until our own, as a specimen of the wonder then performed. They relate also many other matters worthy of note respecting the life of this man. Among these, such as the following. Certain fellows not being able to endure the firm and constant character of his life, fearing also lest they should be taken and punished for the numerous crimes of which they were conscious, endeavoured to anticipate him, by plotting an artifice against him. They gave currency therefore to a foul slander against him. Then, in order to make the hearers believe, they confirmed their accusations with oaths; and one of them prayed that he might perish with fire; another that his body might be wasted with a miserable and foul disease; a third that he should be deprived of his eyes; but notwithstanding their oaths, none of the faithful heeded them, on account of the well-known continent and virtuous life which Narcissus had always led. Unable, however, to endure the wickedness of these men, and having besides already long before embraced a life of contemplation, he ran away from the body of the church, and continued many years concealed in deserts and trackless wilds. But the omnipotent eye of justice did not remain inactive in the midst of these things; but soon descended with his judgments upon the impious wretches, and bound them with the curses they had invoked. The first, indeed, in consequence of a light spark falling upon his habitation without any apparent cause, was burnt with his whole family. The next was forthwith covered with the disease which he had imprecated upon himself, from the extremity of his feet to the top of his head. The third, perceiving the events of the former two, and dreading the inevitable judgment of the all-seeing God, confessed, indeed, to all the slander which had been concocted in common among them. But he was so wasted with excessive grieving, and so incessantly diffused with tears, that at last both his eyes were destroyed. And these suffered the punishment due to their calumnies.








Copyright ©1999-2016 e-Catholic2000.com